171010 with Details

171010

171010 Detail

171010 Detail

171010 Detail

171010 Detail

This piece is inspired by the the textures and tiles that adorn the buildings in Porto Portugal. I'm always struck by how a beautiful stimulating environment is at once inspirational and also a creative black hole.

Robert NendzaComment
170923 with Details

170923

170923 Detail

170923 Detail

170923 Detail

170923 Detail

There is no overt political, religious or social message in my work. But, I do hope that it inspires people to elevate their thinking. 

Robert NendzaComment
170920 with Details

170920

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170920 Detail

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170920 Detail

The reason that everything has meaning is that there is a reason for everything.

Robert NendzaComment
170914 with Details

170914

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170914 Detail

Our ability to accept and drive the adoption of new better ideas and technologies always lags much farther behind than I'd prefer.

Robert NendzaComment
170913 with Details

170913

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170913 Detail

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170913 Detail

Isn't life all about adding layers? Seasons, events, cycles, repetition, all semi-transparently laid down and built upon one another, sometimes forming structures and other times just adding to the background stew.

Robert NendzaComment
170909 with Details

170909

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170909 Detail

170909 Detail

"A leopard can't change its spots." But he can know his pattern and choose the best environment in which to wear it.

Robert NendzaComment
170908 with Details

170908

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170908 Detail

170908 Detail

170908 Detail

I read that archeologists recently discovered artifacts from a village in Canada that date between 12,000 to 14,000 years old.

Robert NendzaComment
170901 with Details

170901

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170901 Detail

170901 Detail

Robots, nuclear war, AI, dark matter, politics, jobs, multiverse, exercise, depression, electric vehicles, Mars colonization, religion, money, Instagram, art... Time for a nap.

Robert NendzaComment
170826 with Details

170826

170826 Detail

170826 Detail

170826 Detail

One of the themes I play with from time to time is the relationship between two or three subjects. Sometimes I think of them as people, sometimes plants or animals, and sometimes just objects. This one had me thinking about a pair of trees growing up together—wondering if they are aware of each other.

Robert NendzaComment
170805 with Details

170805

170805 Detail

170805 Detail

170805 Detail

I've had an interesting conversation with life-long friend from art school over the past couple of days. We've been back and forth on the pros and cons of technological "progress." Despite the romantic notion of a "simpler time," I definitely come down on the side of embracing the future in the hope that progress will enable us to transcend our biological limitations and cultural stigmas.

Robert NendzaComment
170722 with Details

170722

170722 Detail

170722 Detail

170722 Detail

Self-similarity interests me on so many levels. It is the foundation of elegant design. It is the model of nature and evolution. It's true to its own nature from the atomic scale to the cosmic. There doesn't seem to be much written about its importance or role in the laws of the physics, but it seems to me to be as fundamental as gravity itself.

Robert NendzaComment
170714 with Details

170714

170714 Detail

170714 Detail

170714 Detail

170714 Detail

170714 Detail

Someone recently asked about the borders I incorporate into the top and bottom of my pieces. If you are inclined to look at my oldest work you can see that it evolved early on with some trial and error. At first, I simply experimented with it as a compositional element, then as I started to consider it more deeply, a few ideas emerged. As I'm working I usually make the border last. It gives me a strong sense that I'm finished and offering the piece to the viewer at that moment—literally as if I'm handing it to someone. Leaving the two sides "open" makes a subtle statement that you are free to visually enter and exit the piece—to walk through it. The open sides also allow my body of work to be tied together and experienced as a continuum.

Robert NendzaComment
170706 with Details

170706

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170706 Detail

170706 Detail

I've watched a few art documentaries over past week or two. The first was David Lynch's "Art Life," then one about HR Giger's last days, and lastly one about Peggy Guggenheim "Art Addict." All interesting, and very different, but had a few things in common. They all lived art immersively with a blind obsession, never fazed by lack of talent, critical affirmation or even their own sometimes tragic personal lives.

Robert NendzaComment
170701 with Details

170701

170701 Detail

170701 Detail

170701

The Golden Ratio (1:1.618). It's said that the human body and face, and many examples in nature, display this proportion. It's then assumed that we naturally prefer these proportions in made objects. There is a similar phenomenon in sound and music where certain frequencies (notes) and combinations of frequencies (chords) are pleasing to our ears while other aren't. I imagine that these things come from somewhere very fundamental. I consider proportion constantly as I'm making art. I virtually never break out a calculator or grid but there is definitely a point where compositional choices feel right.

Robert NendzaComment
170614 with Details

170614

170614 Detail

170614 Detail

170614 Detail

I'm always looking for the right mix—the perfect balance of not too hot, not too cold, not too hard, not too soft, not too much, not too little—juuust right. Then it occurs to me that the people who leave a mark are, more often than not, extremists. 

Robert NendzaComment
170602 with Details

170602

170602 Detail

170602 Detail

170602 Detail

This piece and the one just prior to this (170601) are the results of the same piece that split midstream. This happens often but I typically only complete one of the directions or merge them back together at some point. In this case I liked both the angular and vertical compositions so I completed both as separate pieces.

Robert NendzaComment